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Check if your child is getting enough vitamin D

Take our quick and easy 3-step test

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How old is your child?

This calculator is not suitable for 0-6 month olds

Exclusive breastfeeding (giving your baby breast milk only) is recommended for around the first six months (26 weeks) of your baby's life. Between 0–6 months, your baby should get all the nutrition they need from either breastmilk or infant formula. Weaning is not recommended until 6 months and certainly not before 4 months.

To provide your baby with the vitamin D they need, the Department of Health recommends that all pregnant women and breastfeeding mums should have 10 Micrograms (mcg) of vitamin D a day.

If you are breastfeeding your baby and you did not take a vitamin D supplement during pregnancy, your baby could be at risk of having a low vitamin D status. So, your health visitor may advise you to give your baby vitamin drops containing 7–8.5mcg of vitamin D from 1 month onwards. Remember to always stick to the recommended dose stated on the packaging.

If your baby is being formula fed, they should be getting enough vitamin D from their infant milk which is fortified. They will only need vitamin drops when they start drinking less than 500ml (1 pint) of formula milk a day. Should you have any concerns, please ask your health visitor.

Select which sources of vitamin D-rich food your child has eaten in the last 24 hours

calculate

Fortified Milk

Growing Up Milk

0 servings

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Growing Up Milk

x

Per 100ml.

Serving sizes vary. Toddlers can be given around 300-500ml a day. Please check the on-pack instructions.

Only suitable from 12 months.

Note: vitamin D levels calculated from an average taken from Aptamil Growing Up Milk, Cow & Gate Growing Up Milk, HIPP organic Growing up Milk and SMA Toddler Milk.

Infant Formula

0 servings

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Infant Formula

x

1 serving = 100ml

Serving size will depend on the product and your feeding routine. Please check the on-pack instructions before serving.

Suitable for babies 0-12 months.

Note: vitamin D levels calculated from an average taken from Aptamil First milk, Cow & Gate First Infant Milk, HIPP First Infant Milk and SMA First Infant Milk.

Follow-on Milk

0 servings

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Follow-on Milk

x

1 serving = 100ml

Babies should have around 600ml a day. Please check the on-pack instructions before serving.

Suitable for babies 6-24 months.

Note: vitamin D levels calculated from an average taken from Aptamil Follow On Milk, Cow & Gate Follow-on Milk, HIPP Follow On Milk and SMA Follow On Milk.

Evaporated Milk

0 servings

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Evaporated Milk

x

1 serving = 1 tablespoon

Based on whole milk variety.

Evaporated milk should never be used as a sole source of nutrition instead of breast milk or infant formula. It may be included as part of a balanced diet from 12 months.

Cows' Milk

Cows' milk is not included on this test as it is not a rich source of vitamin D.

Total Fortified Milk servings: 0

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Fortified Cereal

Fortified Family Cereal

0 servings

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Fortified Family Cereal

x

1 serving = 25g

Prepared with cows' milk.

Based on average serving fortified with vitamin D, including Kellogg’s cereals, Rice Krispies, Corn Flakes and Bran Flakes.

Note: not all family cereals are fortified with vitamin D. Always check the pack.

Fortified Infant Cereal

0 servings

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Fortified Infant Cereal

x

1 serving = 25g

Prepared with cows' milk, or warm previously boiled water.

Based on average serving fortified with vitamin D, from Aptamil, Cow & Gate, Heinz and Organix.

Total Fortified Cereal servings: 0

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Fish

Tuna

0 servings

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Tuna

x

1 serving = 50g

Based on tinned skipjack tuna. See NHS recommendations for fish and shellfish here

Sardines

0 servings

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Sardines

x

1 serving = 50g

Based on tinned sardines. See NHS recommendations for fish and shellfish here

Trout

0 servings

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Trout

x

1 serving = 50g

Based on fresh, grilled trout. See NHS recommendations for fish and shellfish here

Salmon

0 servings

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Salmon

x

1 serving = 50g

Based on fresh, grilled salmon. See NHS recommendations for fish and shellfish here

Mackerel

0 servings

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Mackerel

x

1 serving = 50g

Based on fresh, grilled mackerel. See NHS recommendations for fish and shellfish here

Herring

0 servings

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Herring

x

1 serving = 50g

Based on fresh, grilled herring. See NHS recommendations for fish and shellfish here

Total Fish servings: 0

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Spreads & yogurts

Margarine

0 servings

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Margarine

x

1 serving = 7g

Based on soft, polyunsaturated margarine spread on one slice of bread.

Fromage Frais

0 servings

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Fromage Frais

x

1 serving = 1 small pot (approx. 50g)

Based on fromage frais fortified with vitamin D.

Note: not all fromage frais are fortified with vitamin D. Always check the pack.

Childrens Yogurt

0 servings

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Childrens Yogurt

x

1 serving = 40g pot

Based on yogurt fortified with vitamin D.

Note: not all childrens yogurts are fortified with vitamin D. Always check the pack.

Total Spreads & yogurts: 0

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Eggs & offal

Chicken Egg

0 servings

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Chicken Egg

x

1 medium size egg = 58g

Based on a whole, hard-boiled egg.

Duck Egg

0 servings

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Duck Egg

x

1 medium size egg = 75g

Based on a whole, hard-boiled egg.

Calf Liver

0 servings

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Calf Liver

x

1 serving = 40g

Based on one fried slice.

Lambs Liver

0 servings

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Lambs Liver

x

1 serving = 40g

Based on one fried slice.

Pig Liver

0 servings

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Pig Liver

x

1 serving = 50g

Based on one stewed serving.

Liver Pâté

0 servings

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Liver Pâté

x

1 serving = 40g

Based on average serving for one slice of bread.

Total Eggs & offal servings: 0

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Supplements

Cod Liver Oil

0 servings

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Cod Liver Oil

x

1 dose = 1 teaspoon

Please check the on-pack instructions for the recommended dose for your child's age before serving.

Cod liver oil contains vitamins A and D. Ask a healthcare professional for advice before giving your child more than one type of supplement.

Vitamin Drops

0 servings

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Vitamin Drops

x

1 dose

Based on Healthy Start vitamin drops and other baby vitamin D drops.

Recommended doses can vary between products. Please check the on-pack instructions for the recommended dose for your child's age before serving.

Vitamin D Oral Spray

0 servings

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Vitamin D oral spray

x

1 dose = 1 spray

Based on DLux Infant vitamin D oral spray, containing 7.5 mcg/300IU. To achieve recommended dosage, please check on-pack instructions.

Total Supplements servings: 0

done

Your child’s sources of vitamin D

Milk
Cereals
Fish
Spreads & Yogurts
Eggs
Supplements

Today, your child has had...

%

of vitamin D from their diet alone, over the last 24 hours.

Great work!

It looks like your child is getting their recommended daily intake of vitamin D. Getting enough vitamin D is important for the normal development of bones, teeth and a variety of other benefits. It’s absolutely fine that they may be getting over 100% of their daily dietary intake, so don’t worry and keep up the good work.

Find out how to ensure they get just the right amount

Based on what your child ate today, it looks like your child may need more vitamin D in their diet.

Vitamin D is crucial for the healthy growth and development of children’s bones and teeth.

There are several simple things you can do to help your child get all the vitamin D they need. Certain foods, Fortified Milks and supplements can help top up their levels.

Find out how to ensure they get the right amount.

Based on what you told us today, it looks like your child is getting more than enough vitamin D from their diet.

Getting enough vitamin D is important for the normal development of bones, teeth and a variety of other benefits. Whilst it’s great that they are getting adequate vitamin D, do be cautious not to give them too much.

Many children can occasionally get a slightly large dose, for example, on a sunny day, and this is nothing to worry about. Just bear in mind, your little one’s body can store vitamin D for about 2 months, so the total dose over a month is more important than the daily dose.

Find out how to ensure they get just the right amount.

Based on what you told us today, it looks like your child is getting too much vitamin D.

Don’t panic, but consider reducing their daily intake as soon as possible. Too much vitamin D can cause a rise in blood calcium. The symptoms include vomiting, diarrhoea or constipation, increased thirst and urination, headache, tiredness, dizziness, and weight loss. If your child becomes unwell with any of these symptoms contact your doctor as your little one may need a blood test to check their calcium level.

Whilst you cannot get too much vitamin D from the sun alone, it is possible to have too much from diet and supplements. So, remember not to give more than the recommended dose of supplements.

Find out how to ensure they get just the right amount.

Great work!

It looks like your child is getting their recommended daily intake of vitamin D. Getting enough vitamin D is important for the normal development of bones, teeth and a variety of other benefits. It’s absolutely fine that they may be getting over 100% of their daily dietary intake, so don’t worry and keep up the good work.

Find out how to ensure they get just the right amount

Based on what your child ate today, it looks like your child may need more vitamin D in their diet.

Vitamin D is crucial for the healthy growth and development of children’s bones and teeth.

There are several simple things you can do to help your child get all the vitamin D they need. Certain foods, Fortified Milks and supplements can help top up their levels.

Find out how to ensure they get the right amount.

Based on what you told us today, it looks like your child is getting more than enough vitamin D from their diet.

Getting enough vitamin D is important for the normal development of bones, teeth and a variety of other benefits. Whilst it’s great that they are getting adequate vitamin D, do be cautious not to give them too much.

Many children can occasionally get a slightly large dose, for example, on a sunny day, and this is nothing to worry about. Just bear in mind, your little one’s body can store vitamin D for about 2 months, so the total dose over a month is more important than the daily dose.

Find out how to ensure they get just the right amount.

Based on what you told us today, it looks like your child is getting too much vitamin D.

Don’t panic, but consider reducing their daily intake as soon as possible. Too much vitamin D can cause a rise in blood calcium. The symptoms include vomiting, diarrhoea or constipation, increased thirst and urination, headache, tiredness, dizziness, and weight loss. If your child becomes unwell with any of these symptoms contact your doctor as your little one may need a blood test to check their calcium level.

Whilst you cannot get too much vitamin D from the sun alone, it is possible to have too much from diet and supplements. So, remember not to give more than the recommended dose of supplements.

Find out how to ensure they get just the right amount.



In the UK, there is no recommended daily intake for vitamin D for children 4 years and above, despite Government recommendations that all children aged 6 months to 5 years take a supplement containing vitamin D. For the purposes of this calculator we have measured their intake against an RNI of 7mcg.

This calculator provides a snapshot of your child's vitamin D intake for one day. Try taking the test on different days to get a better sense of how much your child is getting. The body can store vitamin D for about 2 months, so intake over a month is more important than the daily intake.

These calculations are based on food averages, and may not be 100% representative of actual intake. Also, whilst most sources were included, some other foods containing Vitamin D do exist. Reference Nutrient Intakes (RNIs) act as a guide only and cannot determine deficiency or sufficiency. If you are concerned about the Vitamin D status of your child, please talk to a healthcare professional.